Tag Archives: Postcolonialism

The Racial Lexicon of Development in Postcolonial Africa: The Case of Ghana

Jemima Pierre (UCLA)
10/06/2014
 
If colonial rule in Africa depended upon a racial hierarchy that simultaneously consolidated supposedly “tribal” difference and white racial and cultural and political supremacy, what happens to this structure at the end of formal colonial rule? Following this, what does it mean to explore racial formations in our analyses of decolonization and the African postcolony? In this lecture, I use examples from my current ethnographic and historical research on resource extraction – specifically focusing on Ghana as a new oil exporter – to tackle these questions. I argue that “development-speak” converges with “oil-speak” to create a particular racial lexicon that upholds historical, (neo)colonial hierarchies. In so doing, I demonstrate one of the many ways that race continues to be rearticulated in postcolonial Africa.
* Co-sponsored by the Center for Africana Studies
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Colonial Desires: Imperial Negotiation in the Iron Age Caucasus

Lauren Ristvet (Penn)
9/18/2013

Desire lies at the heart of many theoretical interventions into the logic and practice of empire.  As a factor behind the endless accumulation of capital and a stimulus for conquest, desire may fuel colonial expansion. Similarly, the language of desire and sexual union is implicit in colonial and post-colonial discourses on race and hybridity.  I will consider the operation of empire in the Iron Age Caucasus in terms of multiple and conflicting desires, investigating their economic, cultural, and political implications.